Lead From Need: Raising Employee Engagement Levels

Raising Employee Engagement Levels
Raising Employee Engagement Levels

His CEO performance review is in and Scott is clearly alarmed. Unless next quarter’s KPI goals are met the Governance committee will ask for his resignation. He grabs his phone and calls Jerin, his gregarious college roommate and the person who transformed Silicon Beach’s most dysfunctional company into one of its most electric. “Jerin, I need your help. My staff is not producing like they once were. They are lethargic, apathetic, unmotivated, dis…”

“Disengaged!,” interjects Jerin. “You need to think about raising employee engagement levels.”

“We’ve been investing heavily into employee engagement programs, but they’re not really working. We keep pouring money into recruiting and retaining the best. We even keep increasing salaries, benefits and perks, basically giving them everything they want, but nothing’s working.”

“The problem is you’re giving them what they think they want, but not what they really need,” explains Jerin. “Your employees are emotionally detached; their real needs aren’t being met. Fat salaries and perks are great, but what they really want is to be inspired, connected and living a life of purpose. They need to feel valued. As their leader you need to lead from need. Once our basic survival needs have been met, we all aspire to satisfy the five deeper needs; connection, contribution, freedom, growth and fun.”

Raising Employee Engagement Levels

Jerin is right and is part of a new wave of leaders who know that raising employee engagement levels is to coach and empower your employees to greatness. As a leader in your organization you want to ensure that your employees feel they are:

Connected: building relationships with others
Contributing: doing something meaningful
Free: have a sense of choice and autonomy
Growing: developing personally and professionally
Having Fun: really enjoying their time at work

Connection

Companies with employees who have strong personal ties to each other have far higher engagement rates than those that don’t. To connect with your employees, create greater trust and loyalty by being more authentic. Great leaders don’t fret over public opinion and neither should you. Let go of who you think you should be, and just be yourself. You will gain their trust and respect in the process. Be vulnerable. Show them the real you. We all have the same fears of not being good enough, smart enough or worthy enough, so why pretend we are the exception? The best managers connect deeply with their employees by paying attention to what’s important to them. Carve out some time each week to grab lunch or a coffee with your key team members. Find out what they enjoy doing outside of work and get to know them personally. Finally, let them know that you and the company care for them. As their need to belong is met, they will give more of themselves, which, in turn, fuels their next need: their need to contribute.

Contribution

Doing something meaningful gives our life purpose. We all want to be doing something significant with our lives and have those efforts recognized. Studies show employees are happiest when they know they are making a difference and helping others. Often their contribution goes unnoticed. Metrics for measuring an employee’s contribution should shift from measuring their individual performance to measuring their team’s performance. How are your staff members influencing those around them? A staff member with excellent soft skills who constantly uplifts his fellow employees is an incredible asset to your team, yet this won’t show up in any assessment. To help your workers feel they are contributing something meaningful you can try recognizing and publicly celebrating their accomplishments as often as possible or sharing a client story that shows your employee the difference they are making in someone’s life.

Freedom

Self-direction is the key to performance, creativity and engagement. The real you only shows up when you feel free. Employees are far more loyal and productive in workplace environments that respect their freedom and encourage their self-expression. To ensure your staff feels a sense of autonomy remind them that everything they do is a choice. Choice is power, and when your employees believe they have a choice they will become more engaged in the process. Align their choices with their values, not their fears. When we choose from fear, our actions lack power. When we choose from our values our actions have more power, more meaning and more energy. Give your employees more flexibility to accommodate their schedules. What long-held beliefs might be blocking new win-win opportunities? Decentralize whatever authority you can to give your workers more decision-making power. This will empower them and make your company much more efficient.

Growth

If your staff feels they are not making progress in their own personal development they will soon become disconnected and seek opportunities elsewhere. Ensure that each employee is constantly challenged so that they can grow. The greater a person’s belief in their own power to influence an outcome, the more likely they are to succeed with a new challenge. To help your employees grow, try building confidence. Challenge any belief they might have that is limiting their performance. For example, if an employee thinks they aren’t experienced enough to manage a project you can remind them of their unique strengths and capabilities.

Another way to promote growth is modeling. Have inexperienced employees watch other colleagues with similar skills perform more advanced tasks. Seeing others with similar abilities succeed at a task will help them develop positive, “can-do” beliefs. Recognition and positive feedback are key to helping your employees feel more competent, motivated and open to growth. Negative feedback can devastate those with low self-esteem. Finally, optimize the environment. Create a vibrant, energetic, stress-free workplace that encourages your employees to get the food, exercise, rest and water their bodies need so they can perform at their best.

Fun

If work isn’t fun, your employees might eventually burnout. Companies like Apple and Google have taken the lead into turning their organizations into work places that encourage freedom and fun. Making your workplace fun will raise your employees’ morale and energy and is the key to stimulating their creativity and innovation. It will also help decrease stress and turnover, as well as strengthen the relationships of all of your employees. Make your workplace a lot more fun by gathering your team together for a 30-minute brainstorming session, then voting and Implementing 3-4 fun new ideas.

Conclusion

The most successful leaders in the world are raising employee engagement levels by honoring their employees’ five needs: connection, contribution, freedom, growth and fun. They know that what really motivates people – once their basic financial needs have been met – is their desire to grow and develop as human beings, connect and collaborate with others, contribute something to a worthy cause and have fun while dong so. Like Jarin, you can inspire your employees to reach their full potential by making your company a place where those five needs will be met.

About the Author

Ascanio Pignatelli is an employee engagement expert. He is an award winning speaker, seminar leader, coach, and author of the forthcoming book Lead from Need: Raising Employee Engagement from the Core. He is the founder of ApexCEO, an executive coaching and leadership development group that helps executives develop the leadership and communication skills to create more engaging workplaces. To find out how Ascanio can help your next speaking event or executive leadership / employee engagement workshops please call 310.913.2313.

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Leadership Pyramid

3 Leadership Traits Every Executive Needs to Master

What three leadership traits will you need to develop to run a very successful organization? The same three that every rockclimber at the top of their game has mastered, and the same three that have contributed to every success you’ve ever had: confidence, energy and enthusiasm. Together they form “The Leadership Pyramid.”

Great leaders like Jesus Christ, Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. were supremely confident, energetic and enthusiastic. Yes, their messages had power, but it was their conviction, determination and passion that inspired people to act on their dreams. That same confidence, energy and enthusiasm is critical when it comes to motivating and engaging employees, inspiring customers or running a successful corporation. As an executive your ability to inspire your vendors, customers, investors and employees will dictate your success or failure. Unfortunately, most leaders don’t get this. They may blame their lack of results on not having the right people or team in place, however a weak leader will never attract a stronger leader. And engaged employees will only show up when a strong leader is there first. Develop more confidence, energy and enthusiasm and you will attract, retain and engage employees with less effort and more effectiveness.

Start with confidence. On a scale of one to ten, (and be brutally honest here), what would your level of confidence be if you were about to walk into a boardroom to do your first Fortune 500 deal? Would you stand a chance if your confidence were not at a level 10? Now ask yourself which areas of your life you lack level 10 confidence and how is that affecting you?

Perhaps it’s time to find a leadership coach or mentor who can help you develop a winning mindset. You will want to challenge whatever thoughts, beliefs or assumptions are limiting you. The most successful people in the world had great tutors, coaches, and mentors. Alexander the Great had Aristotle, Plato had Socrates and the disciples had Jesus. CEO’s of Fortune 100 companies don’t go it alone and neither should you. Consider joining a mastermind or business network of successful people that would be happy to help you uncover your blind spots, hold you accountable and empower you whenever you feel overwhelmed.

Your coach or group will also be integral in the second leadership trait: your energy. If you take care of yourself physically, and your energy is not a 10, your mindset is the culprit. Running in the background are hidden thoughts or limiting beliefs that are draining your energy and enthusiasm. A coach or mastermind team is invaluable here. Your energy will naturally rise as you begin identifying and challenging whatever is blocking you. And since your staff mirrors your energy, as that energy improves, so too will the energy of your entire team. Set the energetic tone for your organization and watch employee morale, output and productivity rise with a heightened level of energy.

Lastly, strive for level 10 enthusiasm. We know how infectious enthusiasm is and nothing can turn a business, or management team around faster than authentic enthusiasm. The key here is to have a clear vision of where you and the company will be in ten years. Visualize what it will be like when you have accomplished your goals? Reflect back to why you may have joined or started the business, focus on how your company’s products or services are contributing to others and the impact your company makes on its employees. We often brush aside the enormous difference we make in the world but remembering the people we serve can help us stay inspired.

Confidence, energy and enthusiasm are fundamental leadership traits for anyone playing at the top of their game. If you and your staff were playing with complete confidence, energy and enthusiasm could anything stop you? Where would you be ten years from now? Please comment below!

About the author

Ascanio Pignatelli is an award winning speaker, executive coach and author of the forthcoming book “Lead from Need: Raising Employee Engagement Levels from the Core”. He is the founder of ApexCEO, an executive coaching and leadership development group that helps C-level executives develop their leadership and communication skills to create more engaging workplaces. To book Ascanio for your next speaking event or workshop, please call him at 310.913.2313 or visit http://www.apexceo.com/.

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The Disconnected CEO

A recent survey revealed that a large percentage of CEOs are rather disconnected. CEO.com and Domo interviewed more than 1500 CEOs, executives, and general employees and found a startling gap between how CEOs view their communication, and how their executives and employees are interpreting it. As CEO, you are constantly reminded of the importance of communicating with clarity. And, if you are anything like the 468 CEOs surveyed, you probably believe that you are an effective communicator. However, the data below shows the gap between what some CEOs are saying and what their workforce is hearing. For instance:

    • 84% of CEOs believe they never speak to reprimand the company.
    • 39% of executives and 32% of general employees claim reprimanding does occur.
    • 1 out of 10 employees say the only communication they get from their CEO is punitive.
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Worldwide, Employee Engagement hovers at 13%

More sad news from Gallup…The latest global ratings are dismal. The majority of employees worldwide, i.e. 63% are “not engaged.” and are unlikely to invest effort into achieving your organization’s mission or vision. Moreover the 24% that are “actively disengaged” at work are unproductive, unhappy and likely to be upsetting their coworkers.

Managers worldwide need to raise employee engagement levels. By adopting a more coach-centric approach managers can help raise those levels by giving their workers more:

  • trust

  • control

  • autonomy

  • responsibility

  • respect

  • development

Increasing engagement at work doesn’t just help your organization’s growth, productivity and morale, it makes the world a much better place.

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4 Ways to Boost Employee Engagement

Employee Engagement, Performance and Satisfaction 

Kevin Wilson was a great leader, but his team was not producing the results he knew they were capable of. One day he arranged a meeting with Jim Hefner, a recently retired executive who had built and led a team that shattered every single company performance record. “Jim, how’d you build such an amazing team? They not only outperform the rest of us but they seem to have more energy, confidence and fun than anyone else.”

“Kevin, I’m a big fan and follower of a branch of industrial-organizational psychology known as Core Self-Evaluations (CSE). That’s what made us so successful. Ever heard of it?”

Kevin shook his head, “No.”

Then with eyes fixated on Kevin’s, Jim leaned in to explain: “Well, CSE is the personality trait responsible for our temperament, our wellbeing, and how we judge our circumstances. It’s also what drives our behavior. People with high core self-evaluations are generally positive and confident in their abilities, satisfied with their jobs and perform them extremely well. On the other hand, those with low core self-evaluations lack confidence, view things negatively and aren’t as satisfied with their jobs and perform them poorly. As manager, your job is to coach and raise the CSE levels of each of your employees.”

Jim is correct; every leader’s primary focus should be to personally coach the best out of their team members. Raising their employees CSE levels is the simplest, quickest and most effective way to do so. Fortunately, CSE can be easily assessed and increased by:

Shifting the Locus of Control

Employees that believe that they control their future have an internal locus of control (Internals) and are generally happier, more empowered, and more productive than (Externals) those who attribute their success or performance to fate or their surroundings. As a result, internals are more satisfied with their work and perform better. You can find out whether your employee is an internal or external by simply asking “What’s been responsible for your success/performance?”

If the answers reveal an external locus of control shift power back to your employee by asking “How does believing that you aren’t causing your success been impacting your career?” Let them explain so they can really experience how they’ve been limiting themselves, then ask: “If you knew that you were in complete control of your success, what would be possible?

Increasing Emotional Intelligence

Employees with a tendency to easily experience unpleasant emotions like anxiety, depression and despair have lower emotional intelligence (EQ) and will react far more negatively to stress. Because their EQ levels are lower, their ability to connect, understand and influence others is severely impaired. For Kevin and others in leadership positions, the need for emotional stability is even more paramount, as they are the face of the organization and set the tone for employee morale. If you have an employee that’s emotionally unstable consider asking: “What can you do to not get so stressed out next time you have a presentation/sales call)?” Or “What would be a more appropriate way to react to an upset client/colleague?

Instilling Self-efficacy

Self-efficacy is the trait responsible for how likely we are to succeed with current goals and tasks, or take on a challenging assignment or “write it off” as impossible. (How likely we are to adhere to a diet or workout program is dictated by our self-efficacy.)

Employees with high self-efficacy are more determined and persistent when dealing with adversity, and more likely to welcome new challenges as opportunities for growth. The greater a person’s belief in their own power to influence an outcome the more likely they are to succeed with a new challenge. The following four step process can help you develop someone else’s self efficacy:

  1. Build confidence- Challenge any belief they might have that is limiting their performance. For example, if an employee thinks they aren’t experienced enough to manage a project you can remind them of their unique strengths and capabilities.
  2. Promote modeling- Have inexperienced employees watch other colleagues with similar skills perform more advanced tasks. Seeing others with similar abilities succeed at a task will help them develop positive, “can-do” beliefs.
  3. Evaluate to motivate- Rewards, recognition and positive feedback are key to helping your employees feel more competent, motivated and open to growth. Negative feedback can devastate those with low self-esteem, as they almost always take it personally. Adopt the 70/30 “sandwich” method when giving an employee feedback on their performance:
  • Start by acknowledging their contributions to date – 35%.
  • Then explain areas and, more importantly, ways their performance can be improved – 30%.
  • Conclude with some positive reinforcement that leaves them feeling respected, supported and valued – 35%.
  1. Optimize the environment- Take a page from any olympic athlete who knows that investing valuable time and energy into their physical and physiological wellbeing is essential for optimal performance. Create a vibrant, energetic, stress-free workplace that encourages your staff to get the food, exercise, rest and water their bodies need so they too can perform at their best.

Increasing their Self-esteem

Self-esteem is the approval we have of ourselves and the extent to which we see ourselves as capable, significant, successful, and worthy. It is one of the most essential of the CSE domains because it is the overall value we place on ourselves as human beings. The productivity of workers with low self esteem is often very low due to their indecisiveness and fear of making mistakes, and striving for perfection which often is not achieved and leads to frustration. Generally they are highly irritable and pessimistic, and can drain the positive, enthusiastic energy of their more self-assured colleagues. Predictably, those with low self-esteem are more likely to be unsatisfied with their jobs, performing them considerably worse than those with higher self-esteem. To boost the self-esteem of your employees:

  1. Recognize and celebrate their successes and accomplishments as much as possible.
  2. Express your gratitude and appreciation to them for the contribution and difference they keep making.
  3. Be a model of kindness and compassion to others, especially those with lower self-esteem.

Conclusion

Jim Hefner understood that coaching the best out of his team meant raising their CSE levels. He did everything he could to raise those levels and as a result his team was always more satisfied with their work, performed it better, and were more confident, motivated and enthusiastic. They were also far less stressed, had less conflict, coped more effectively with setbacks and were better equipped at capitalizing on opportunities. To better engage, empower and motivate your greatest resource and boost the bottom line lead like Jim and raise those CSE levels.

 

Ascanio Pignatelli is an employee engagement expert. He is an award winning speaker, seminar leader, coach, and author of the forthcoming book Lead from Need: Raising Employee Engagement from the Core. He is the founder of ApexCEO, an executive coaching and leadership development group that helps executives develop the leadership and communication skills to create more engaging workplaces. To find out how Ascanio can help your next speaking event or executive leadership / employee engagement workshops please call 310.913.2313.

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Engage Employees with Elevated Communication

Engaging Employee Communication

Kevin Wilson was a great leader, but his team was not producing the results he knew they were capable of. One day he arranged a meeting with Jim Hefner, a recently retired executive who had built and led a team that shattered every single company performance record. “Jim, how’d you build such an amazing team? They not only outperform the rest of us but they seem to have more energy, confidence and fun than anyone else.”

“Kevin, I’m a big fan and follower of a branch of industrial-organizational psychology known as Core Self-Evaluations (CSE). That’s what made us so successful. Ever heard of it?”

Kevin shook his head, “No.”

Then with eyes fixated on Kevin’s, Jim leaned in to explain: “Well, CSE is the personality trait responsible for our temperament, our wellbeing, and how we judge our circumstances. It’s also what drives our behavior. People with high core self-evaluations are generally positive and confident in their abilities, satisfied with their jobs and perform them extremely well. On the other hand, those with low core self-evaluations lack confidence, view things negatively and aren’t as satisfied with their jobs and perform them poorly. As manager, your job is to coach and raise the CSE levels of each of your employees.”

Jim is correct; every leader’s primary focus should be to personally coach the best out of their team members. Raising their employees CSE levels is the simplest, quickest and most effective way to do so. Fortunately, CSE can be easily assessed and increased by:

Shifting the Locus of Control

Employees that believe that they control their future have an internal locus of control (Internals) and are generally happier, more empowered, and more productive than (Externals) those who attribute their success or performance to fate or their surroundings. As a result, internals are more satisfied with their work and perform better. You can find out whether your employee is an internal or external by simply asking “What’s been responsible for your success/performance?”

If the answers reveal an external locus of control shift power back to your employee by asking “How does believing that you aren’t causing your success been impacting your career?” Let them explain so they can really experience how they’ve been limiting themselves, then ask: “If you knew that you were in complete control of your success, what would be possible?

Increasing Emotional Intelligence

Employees with a tendency to easily experience unpleasant emotions like anxiety, depression and despair have lower emotional intelligence (EQ) and will react far more negatively to stress. Because their EQ levels are lower, their ability to connect, understand and influence others is severely impaired. For Kevin and others in leadership positions, the need for emotional stability is even more paramount, as they are the face of the organization and set the tone for employee morale. If you have an employee that’s emotionally unstable consider asking: “What can you do to not get so stressed out next time you have a presentation/sales call)?” Or “What would be a more appropriate way to react to an upset client/colleague?

Instilling Self-efficacy

Self-efficacy is the trait responsible for how likely we are to succeed with current goals and tasks, or take on a challenging assignment or “write it off” as impossible. (How likely we are to adhere to a diet or workout program is dictated by our self-efficacy.)

Employees with high self-efficacy are more determined and persistent when dealing with adversity, and more likely to welcome new challenges as opportunities for growth. The greater a person’s belief in their own power to influence an outcome the more likely they are to succeed with a new challenge. The following four step process can help you develop someone else’s self efficacy:

  • Build confidence- Challenge any belief they might have that is limiting their performance. For example, if an employee thinks they aren’t experienced enough to manage a project you can remind them of their unique strengths and capabilities.
  • Promote modeling- Have inexperienced employees watch other colleagues with similar skills perform more advanced tasks. Seeing others with similar abilities succeed at a task will help them develop positive, “can-do” beliefs.
  • Evaluate to motivate- Rewards, recognition and positive feedback are key to helping your employees feel more competent, motivated and open to growth. Negative feedback can devastate those with low self-esteem, as they almost always take it personally. Adopt the 70/30 “sandwich” method when giving an employee feedback on their performance:
    • Start by acknowledging their contributions to date – 35%.
    • Then explain areas and, more importantly, ways their performance can be improved – 30%.
    • Conclude with some positive reinforcement that leaves them feeling respected, supported and valued – 35%.
  • Optimize the environment- Take a page from any olympic athlete who knows that investing valuable time and energy into their physical and physiological wellbeing is essential for optimal performance. Create a vibrant, energetic, stress-free workplace that encourages your staff to get the food, exercise, rest and water their bodies need so they too can perform at their best.

Increasing their Self-esteem

Self-esteem is the approval we have of ourselves and the extent to which we see ourselves as capable, significant, successful, and worthy. It is one of the most essential of the CSE domains because it is the overall value we place on ourselves as human beings. The productivity of workers with low self esteem is often very low due to their indecisiveness and fear of making mistakes, and striving for perfection which often is not achieved and leads to frustration. Generally they are highly irritable and pessimistic, and can drain the positive, enthusiastic energy of their more self-assured colleagues. Predictably, those with low self-esteem are more likely to be unsatisfied with their jobs, performing them considerably worse than those with higher self-esteem. To boost the self-esteem of your employees:

Recognize and celebrate their successes and accomplishments as much as possible.
Express your gratitude and appreciation to them for the contribution and difference they keep making.
Be a model of kindness and compassion to others, especially those with lower self-esteem.
Conclusion

Jim Hefner understood that coaching the best out of his team meant raising their CSE levels. He did everything he could to raise those levels and as a result his team was always more satisfied with their work, performed it better, and were more confident, motivated and enthusiastic. They were also far less stressed, had less conflict, coped more effectively with setbacks and were better equipped at capitalizing on opportunities. To better engage, empower and motivate your greatest resource and boost the bottom line lead like Jim and raise those CSE levels.

About the Author

Ascanio Pignatelli is an award winning speaker, executive coach and author of the forthcoming book “Lead from Need: Raising Employee Engagement Levels from the Core”. He is the founder of ApexCEO, an executive coaching and leadership development group that helps C-level executives develop their leadership and communication skills to create more engaging workplaces. To book Ascanio for your next speaking event or workshop, please call him at 310.913.2313 or visit http://www.apexceo.com/.

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How to Challenge Limiting Beliefs

Energy Block #1: Limiting Beliefs

Henry Ford once said: “Believe you can, or believe you can’t. Either way you are right.” He was correct: if you believe that the outcome you’re looking for is highly improbable, you either won’t attempt it, or if you do you’ll invest very little energy into achieving that goal.

Below are some examples of limiting beliefs:

    • Leaders are born, not made.
  • You can’t have a job and be a good mother at the same time.
  • You’re either born with creativity or you’re not.
  • There’s no place for emotion’s at the workplace.

On a piece of paper list some beliefs that you have that might be limiting you in some way. How have those beliefs been limiting you? How ready are you to leave them behind and start living the life you really deserve?

How to Challenge Limiting Beliefs
How to Challenge Limiting Beliefs

How to Challenge Limiting Beliefs

Use the following exercise to help you overcome any belief that might be limiting you. On a separate sheet of paper:

  1. Write down a belief that is limiting you.
  2. On the left side of the paper have a column that reads: Proof that the belief is TRUE. On the right side of the paper place a column that reads: Proof that the belief is FALSE. Fill both columns and analyze your findings.
  3. Below that write down where this belief come from?
  4. Now below you’ll want to write down exactly how this belief is limiting you, and the effect it’s had on your life.
  5. Below that write down a new belief to replace your limiting one?
  6. Now look at the TRUE column and challenge each thing you wrote by asking “How true is that really?”
  7. Now write down a new, more empowering belief. Support it with new anecdotes, or evidence.
  8. Visualize yourself adopting and believing this new idea. How does it feel? What might you now be able to accomplish?
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Energy Leadership

Over a hundred years ago, Albert Einstein turned the scientific community upside down with a radical idea that everything we see, hear ,taste, touch and smell is not matter, but energy. Every thought you have has energy. Some of those thoughts are limiting, while others are empowering.  Your limiting thoughts are comprised of catabolic energy — destructive energy that shows up as doubt. worry, guilt, regret, etc. Thoughts that motivate and inspire you are constructive and anabolic.

Leadership is your ability to inspire (yourself and others) and is determined by your level of energy. Your leadership ability is predicated on your energetic state (the amount of anabolic or catabolic energy present at any given moment).

Energy Leadership is a process that helps you become a better leader by raising your level of energy, engagement and awareness. Our system has helped CEO’s and C-Suite executives influence people with far less stress and effort, by shifting them from a destructive, catabolic state to a constructive anabolic state.

For more information on our Energy Leadership Index Assessment and Executive Leadership Workshops please visit http://apexceo.com.

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